FAQ Scroll

I need to migrate my games, but I’ve lost one or more of them. Can I still migrate?

You do not need to have physical possession of your old prim table in order to migrate it to the new mesh system. As long as your table has been recognized by our servers as belonging to you at some point, our system will "know" that you should have the table, and migration should work. If your table is very old, or has never communicated with our servers for some reason (for example, you never rezzed it out), then you may run into problems. In that case, you can contact us for help.

I migrated, and now some of my themes are missing.

We haven’t finished recreating all of the old sculpty themes in mesh for the new system. This is an ongoing project, and we apologize for the inconvenience. As soon as a sculpty theme you owned for the old system is available in mesh, you’ll be able to request a free updated copy. Join the customer group for updates about new releases. In the meantime, if you owned any sculpty add-on themes prior to migration, you will receive a Legacy rezzer that will allow you to use those with your new licenses. The Legacy table works just like the old tables did, with the themes accessible through the tabletop menu.

I migrated my games, and no licenses were delivered to me.

You will not receive a physical copy of your game license. Your license is just data in our server that tells us that you own a particular game. After migrating, you will NOT receive an updated package or folder for each game you own. You will receive packages containing updates for any themed tables that you own, as well as several free tables (Classic, Postmodern, Pocket, and potentially Legacy). You will be able to play any game you own on any table you own. If you feel that one of your games did not migrate successfully, please contact us and we'll look into it for you.

How do I get rid of the annoying info box that pops up when I mouse over my game table?

This is actually something your viewer is doing. Our games cannot produce this info box, and also cannot get rid of it. You can disable this feature in your viewer's preferences (usually labeled as "Hover Tips"), but it will disable it for all objects, not just the table. In most viewers, you can toggle this feature on or off by pressing CTRL+SHIFT+T on your keyboard.

I migrated, and I’m not sure how to get started playing.

When you migrate, you will receive packages containing updates for any themed tables that you own, as well as several free tables (Classic, Postmodern, Pocket, and potentially Legacy). If you rez any of these out, you will see a graphic on top that will tell you how to get started. The instructions are:
  1. Click and HOLD on the tabletop.
  2. Select the button that says "Games."
  3. Select the game you want to play.
Classic is the classic wooden table that most of our customers are used to. The version labeled “4p” has seats for four players. The version labeled “8p” has seats for eight.

My table is telling me that my game is “unlicensed” or that the license is already “in use.”

Occasionally, due to SL glitches or user error, a game license may become "hung up" in our server. This results in a game that may appear to be running, but won't react to user commands, as well as text warnings stating that the game is "unlicensed" or that the license is unavailable. This does not mean that your license has been revoked or lost. It simply needs to be freed up again. There are several ways to accomplish this.
  • Click and hold on the table again in order to bring up the rezzer menu. (On some tables, if you click and hold on the game itself, you may bring up the game-specific menu; in that case, you would see a button that says "Rezzer ->." Click that button to access the rezzer menu.) Then, click the button that says "Games," and then the button that says "None." This will shut down your game. You can then restart it.
  • If that doesn't work, you can click on the Gaming.SL logo on your game tabletop. A menu will appear. Click the button that says "G.SL Force." This will force the license to clear up in our server.
  • If the steps above do not work, you can delete the rezzed table and game elements and wait for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes of failing to communicate with our server, the license will automatically free up for use.
You can prevent game licenses from becoming hung up in this way by:
  • Always turning your game off fully after you're done playing. This is done by following the first set of directions above. Click and hold on the table again in order to bring up the rezzer menu. (On some tables, if you click and hold on the game itself, you may bring up the game-specific menu; in that case, you would see a button that says "Rezzer ->." Click that button to access the rezzer menu.) Then, click the button that says "Games," and then the button that says "None."
  • Not attempting to start a second instance of a game while that game is being played on another table. Remember, one license equals one game. If you're running your only Greedy Greedy license on a table at home, for example, and go over to someone else's place and rez out a copy, you may see a license error. This is because your game is already running back at home. You will have to shut it down, following the instructions above, in order to free up the license for use elsewhere. Alternatively, if you buy another Greedy Greedy license, you will be able to play the game on two tables at once.
  • Not picking up, moving, or deleting your table while a game is running. Shut down your game using the steps above before doing so.

My table and the game running on it have become disconnected.

Your table is definitely broken, but don’t worry! Each mesh table now acts as a rezzer, meaning that it can rez any game that you own. This means that the mesh tables are composed of two objects – the table itself, and the game rezzer. If you have an active game going, and you pick up, move, or delete the table, you will disconnect the table and rezzer. There are a few different ways to fix this.
  1. If the table is still rezzed out, delete any floating game components. Then click and hold on your table, select "Games," and select "None." Then try starting a fresh game.
  2. If that doesn't work, delete the remaining objects and rez out a fresh copy of your game table from your inventory. You may run into a license error message when you try to restart your game; you can see this FAQ for troubleshooting tips if that happens.
The way to avoid this issue is to shut down your game before moving or deleting the table. To shut down your game, click and hold on the table, select "Games" in the menu that appears, and then select "None." Additionally, as the tables now have copy permissions, there is no need to pick up your table anymore. If you’re done with it and don't have any special settings you want to save, you can feel free to delete it.

A table I had rezzed out got returned to me, and now I can’t find it in my inventory.

When more than one object gets returned from a parcel at the same time, Second Life does not send them back to your inventory as individual objects. Instead, it will lump them all together into a single bundle. This bundle will appear in your Lost and Found folder as one inventory item, even if there are 5, 10 or 100 objects actually inside of it. The bundle will only show the name of the first item in the bundle while it is in your inventory. To see what else is inside this bundle, you will have to rez it out. We recommend finding a sandbox to do this in, to make sure that there are enough prims available for whatever happens to be inside the bundle. Some additional things to look out for:
  • Because bundles only show the name of the FIRST item in the bundle and nothing else, this means that the inventory search bar at the top of your inventory window will not help you, as it cannot search inside of bundles.
  • Bundles should have a different icon next to them than single objects do. This is often represented as a stack of smaller boxes, rather than a single large box.
  • If you still can't find your missing objects, you should try clearing your inventory cache in your viewer preferences. This is usually under the "Network & Files" or "Network & Cache" tabs in most viewers. Look for the "Clear Inventory Cache" button, not the standard "Clear Cache" button as that only clears texture caches. You will have to close and restart Second Life after clearing your inventory cache.
  • Returned objects NEVER go back to their creator, they only go back to their OWNER. This is a false rumor. Second Life simply does not work that way, nor has it ever.
  • As a general rule, you should never return anything that you want to keep. Return is for taking out the trash, it's like a bulldozer clearing a lot for new construction. It is not a tool of finesse, and is known to eat objects. Always remember to properly pick up things that you care about, and only use the return function if you have other copies of the object or don't care if you lose it.
If following the above advice does not allow you to find your missing object, we have options for replacement. For older transferable tables, we recommend visiting our store and touching the MIGRATE sign on the wall. This will convert all of your existing transferable game tables over to our new copy/no-trans mesh game system, so that you can't lose them again in the future. This should work even if you've lost your game table. Once you migrate, your games and themes will also show up on our store's redelivery terminal. You can learn more about migration by visiting this page.

I found someone reselling your products, is that allowed?

We do not have an official reseller program at this time. There are only four places where our official products can be purchased: K.R. Engineering's Second Life location. K.R. Engineering's official Marketplace. Infinite's Second Life location. Limited time events. However, many older versions of our products still have no-copy/transfer permissions. Anyone who owns an older version of a game can sell it to someone else, much like you might sell a RL board game at a garage sale or flea market. Customers can do this at in-world "yard sales," or by listing their table on Marketplace. Therefore, you may see advertisements for second-hand tables. Unfortunately, the vast majority of the K.R. Engineering games you will find listed as "second-hand" on Marketplace are actually pirated counterfeits. Therefore, we cannot guarantee the same level of support when it comes to used tables. You automatically assume some risk when purchasing used. For example, if there is a failed delivery, it will be up to you to resolve it with the used reseller. We won't be able to help you, since the game wasn't purchased from us. Likewise, older used tables may fail to update and become unplayable in the process. There's also a good chance that the listing is a straight up scam, and that you will receive nothing for your money. Simply put, we cannot guarantee the legitimacy of any "used" products that are sold by any third party, as we have no affiliation with them. Buyer beware.

I can’t find your product in my inventory.

First, you should verify that the item is actually missing! This seems obvious, but sometimes people look in the wrong places. Here are some common mistakes people make when looking for lost items:
  • If you are using the search bar at the top of your inventory window, you will need to search by the product name, not our company name. For example, if you purchased Greedy Greedy, try searching for "Greedy," not "K.R. Engineering." The object name will be "Greedy Greedy Table vx.xx." While you may see "K.R. Engineering" in the name of some items in the game folder, the game itself is not branded.
  • Do not rely on the "Recent" tab in your inventory window, as this will often not show items that you expect to be 'recent', such as newly purchased items. To verify your object is actually missing, always go to correct folder in your main "Inventory" tab.
  • Verify that you are not looking in an old folder or box. Each time you update your Greedy game, for example, you will have a new folder with a new game in it, and if you haven't deleted your old folders (from before the update) then you may find yourself having multiple folders all called "K.R. Engineering Greedy Greedy (boxed)."
When an object actually goes "missing" in Second Life, the next thing you should do is clear your inventory cache. There are two versions of your inventory; the one that the server knows about and the one that your computer knows about. Sometimes these can be end up being different due to communication errors between the server and your computer, and clearing your inventory cache forces your computer to update what it thinks is in your inventory to be the same as what the server thinks is in your inventory. Very often objects will reappear after doing this, especially objects that were lost due to 'failed to rez' errors. If you still can't find your missing object, there's a good chance that it was returned to you at some point by the owner of the land you last rezzed it on or even by Second Life itself, such as when a parcel goes over prim limits. In this case, your object should be in your Lost and Found folder and just needs to be moved back to its normal folder, BUT it may be hidden! This is a feature of Second Life, and you can read about it in our FAQ on returned objects. If following the above advice does not allow you to find your missing object, you have a few options. If your tables were older prim models, migrating them to our new mesh system may solve your issue and get you the appropriate replacements.  If your tables are newer mesh models, the redelivery terminal in our store will allow you to request replacements. If you're still having problems, you can contact us; in most cases we will be able to provide a replacement, as long as your table was purchased from us originally. If you bought your object used from a third-party reseller, we may have no record of it.

I bought one of your games on the Second Life Marketplace, and I only received a notecard and a landmark to the store. Where is my purchase?

When you buy a game from us off of Marketplace, your delivery is not handled by the SL Marketplace itself. Instead, your purchase will trigger a delivery from K.R. Engineering's own server. This setup allows us to deploy game updates in an efficient manner, as all store and Marketplace purchases are fulfilled by one delivery server. The notecard you received with your MP purchase explains this situation, and also explains that our delivery server can occasionally experience interruptions due to issues with Second Life or our hosting platform. If you do not receive your purchase after a reasonable period of time has passed, use the landmark to travel to our store. On the wall by the door is a button marked REDELIVER. If you click this button, you will be directed to a page where you can request a redelivery of your game. Detailed instructions on how to use our in-store terminal to get product redeliveries are also available here. Alternatively, if you have a Gaming.SL Live account, you can request a redelivery online. You can learn more about Gaming.SL Live accounts on this page, and get detailed instructions on how to make an account or change your password here. Also, please be aware that the Marketplace is full of counterfeit tables. Some "second-hand table" listings may be scams intended to steal your Lindens, offering absolutely nothing in return. If it was your intention to purchase a game directly from us, make sure that your Marketplace transaction notes that you paid Karsten Rutledge. If you paid anyone else, you will have to take the failed delivery issue up with them.

I’m attempting to get a redelivery, and it’s not working.

By far the most common reason for "redelivery failure" is due to customers trying to get redeliveries of their older, no-copy prim games. The in-store redelivery terminal and Gaming.SL Live's redelivery buttons only work with our mesh tables and games. If your games are older prim models, our Migration article explains how you can migrate your prim games to the new mesh system and receive updated copies. The second most common reason for "redelivery failure" stems from customers requesting redelivery of their purchases through the Second Life Marketplace. We have turned off the redelivery option, but if for some reason it appears active on a listing due to a bug on Linden Lab's part, you may only receive a notecard and landmark if you try to use it. Please do not use Marketplace's redelivery option, even if it appears to be available. Instead, please request a redelivery by visiting our store or using your Gaming.SL Live account. Finally, if you own one of our mesh game tables and you're having trouble using the in-store or website redelivery options, we will need to figure out which step of the process isn't working for you. This page contains illustrated instructions for both redelivery methods. If the page itself isn't helpful to you, please contact us with a description of what you've tried, and what step of the process seems to be failing. We'll be happy to help you.

I bought or updated something, and everything is in the folder except for the actual product.

This is an unlikely situation, but there are many reasons why it may appear that your folder is empty. Here some of the most common reasons:
  1. If this is a newer version of a game you previously owned and updated, you may be looking in an old folder or box from your previous table. Make sure that you don't have multiple folders/boxes with the same name, and verify that you are looking in the most recent one.
  2. If you are using the search bar at the top of your inventory window, you will need to search by the product's name, not our company name. For example, if you purchased Greedy Greedy, try searching for "Greedy," not "K.R. Engineering." The object name will be "Greedy Greedy Table vx.xx." While you may see "K.R. Engineering" in the name of some items in the game folder, the game itself is not branded.
  3. Do not use the "Recent" tab on your inventory window. The ways of the Recent tab are mysterious and shadowy, it does not always show you everything that's been added to your inventory recently. Look for the folder in your normal Inventory tab.
  4. You may have gotten the item and then subsequently misplaced it without meaning to. This is a "feature" of Second Life. It occurs whenever you attempt to rez a folder full of objects all at once in some Second Life viewers, by dragging the folder out of your inventory instead of individual items. When this happens, Second Life interprets this as "put this folder of stuff INSIDE whatever I dropped it on." In this case, you have everything except the game/product because it is transfer-only, and everything else in the folder is copyable. Your game/product is inside whatever prim you dropped it on, probably your floor or rug, for example.
    1. This can also occur if you press the CTRL button on your keyboard when dragging and dropping just the table by itself.
    2. There may be other ways to do this that are not listed here, depending on the viewer you are using, but the end result is the same.
    3. Also keep in mind, it is inside the PRIM you dropped it on, not the OBJECT you dropped it on, even if you dropped it on a prim that is in a linked object. You will probably have to enable "Edit Linked Parts" in your build window to look in individual prims, rather than whole objects.
    4. It is possible you put the game/product inside an object that you don't own, for example if it is a group owned object or if you have modify rights on someone else's objects (such as your significant other). If this is the case, you don't own it anymore as ownership is transferred to the person who owns the object it is inside of. You may have to ask them to retrieve it for you and return it to you.
    5. If you are ultimately unable to locate the item, please contact us. If we can't help you find it, then we can usually replace the lost table.

I see that you now sell your games and your tables/themes separately — how does that work?

In 2018, K.R. Engineering products made the leap from standard SL prims to mesh. While mesh has revolutionized the SL landscape, it is not without certain limitations. In the case of our games, the biggest issue is that mesh cannot be scripted to change shape the way standard and sculpty prims can. For this reason, each table/theme we offer is now a standalone object, and our games take the form of digital licenses which we store on our server for you. You can use any K.R. Engineering table or theme that you own to access your entire K.R. Engineering game collection. In order to clarify the fact that our tables and games are separate objects, we decided to make them separate purchases. For this reason, you will not automatically receive a table or theme when you purchase a game. You may want to think of our new mesh tables and themes like game consoles (for example, a Playstation or a Nintendo Switch). If you purchased a digital game on the Playstation Network or Nintendo eShop, you would need the appropriate console in order to play it. If you didn't have a console, the game would be useless to you. Similarly, you must own one of our mesh tables or themes in order to access your game collection. We can also use the game console example in other ways. If you purchased a digital game on the Playstation Network or Nintendo eShop (or on Steam), you wouldn't expect the company to mail you a physical disk of that game. Similarly, when you purchase a digital game from K.R. Engineering, you will not receive a physical object. Instead, your game will be assigned to your account in the cloud, and you will need a mesh theme or table to access it. In order to guide our customers, and remind them that they must own both a table/theme and a game, we have placed signs in multiple locations in our store. You can click each picture in order to view a larger version.   [caption id="attachment_2701" align="aligncenter" width="400"] These signs are posted in every corner of the store.[/caption]   [caption id="attachment_2702" align="aligncenter" width="400"] This sign is visible directly ahead of you when you walk through the store door.[/caption]   [caption id="attachment_2705" align="aligncenter" width="400"] This reminder is posted beside every game in the store.[/caption]   In addition to our premium themes, we offer a handful of free themes. They are located on the wall along with the other themes, and currently include Classic, Pocket, and Postmodern. Please click here for a SLURL to their location. If you are a brand new customer, we also have a special promotion to help you get started. If you purchase the Infinite theme before you purchase your first game, you will receive L$399 in store credit (equivalent to the price of the table). You can then apply this credit toward your first game purchase, or toward any purchase in our store.   [caption id="attachment_2703" align="aligncenter" width="400"] The Infinite theme is located directly next to the front door. It is highlighted in bright, glowing green.[/caption]   In order to use your store credit, simply click on the vendor you wish to purchase from.   [caption id="attachment_2704" align="aligncenter" width="300"] These instructions are posted on every game vendor as a helpful reminder.[/caption]   You should then see a menu pop up with three buttons. Click the one that says "Use Credit." You will then be prompted to pay the remainder, if applicable.   [caption id="attachment_2706" align="aligncenter" width="400"] The location of the "Use Credit" button.[/caption]

Many pirates have copied and sold your tables illegally. Is there a list of known scammers somewhere?

The people on this list are sellers who use deceptive practices in an attempt to commit fraud, or are selling pirated games that are illegally duplicated, or both. Deceptive practices include things such as unauthorized use of K.R. Engineering's vendor images and logos. Scammers may also use images of much newer, supported tables to sell you tables that are old and unsupported, and they do this knowingly. Often they will use deceptive titles to trick people into thinking they are officially endorsed by K.R. Engineering, or that their lower prices are merely reflective of a "sale" that is going on. These scammers have been notified personally by K.R. Engineering staff that what they're doing is fraud, and that their tables are not supported, but they refuse to modify their listings to inform their customers that they are selling unsupported products.
  • SCAMMER: LORD Muliaina
  • SCAMMER: xXxOVERLORDxXx Exon
  • SCAMMER: LuLzZz
  • SCAMMER: Sacha Quartz
  • SCAMMER: Trouble Riddler
  • SCAMMER: worstnightmayre
  • SCAMMER: Cristina Hazelnut
If you're not sure whether you've purchased something from a scammer, known or otherwise, you can check your order history on the Marketplace. If the invoice for your order does not say "Sold by Karsten Rutledge", then you were likely scammed.

What hours are you online and/or available for immediate, in-person assistance?

At the risk of sounding snarky: Never. Both of the people behind K.R. Engineering (Karsten Rutledge and VelvetPurrsons) are incredibly busy in their real lives, and simply do not spend a lot of time hanging out on SL anymore. Additionally, technical limitations can often make logging in arduous. For that reason, K.R. Engineering offers support primarily over email. Even if you IM one of us directly, we will still respond to your IM via email. So, what is the best way to get help?
  1. Try searching this website. Go ahead and ask it questions naturally -- it is programmed to respond to things like "can't find my table" or "didn't get delivery." Chances are, your question is answered somewhere within its depths.
  2. If you don't find your answer, navigate on over to our contact page. There you will find many options for contacting us, both inside and outside SL.
  3. Whether you email us, use the contact form, or IM VelvetPurrsons, just go ahead and tell us about your problem in detail. Include things like any error messages you received, and the version number of your table. 
  4. Please extend us some patience. It may take us a few business days to get back to you, and there may be long breaks between IMs as we assist with your issue.
Again, not to put too fine a point on it, but your chances of nailing us down for a long, sustained IM conversation are incredibly slim. Your best bet for a fast resolution is just to give us as much information about your issue as you can right up front. If we do need to visit your land or see your table in SL, we will log on to do this. However, these visits are rarely useful for diagnostic purposes. Thank you for your understanding.

I contacted you for help, and you said that you’re having trouble understanding my problem. How can I make my problem clearer for you?

If you received a link to this page directly from us, it's likely that you have sent us multiple messages that we have deemed unintelligible. This means that in spite of our good faith efforts, we simply cannot understand what you are saying to us or asking us to do. It may also mean that you are not giving us the information we need. What do unintelligible messages look like?
  • "come help me" / "i need help"
  • "my table is broke :("
  • "i dunno what the problem is"
  • "thing floating in space"
  • "i don't have time to talk about it come fiiiiix iiiitt!"
  • "i hate this thing" / "just give me my money back"
  • "i needd hanp it's jos the blue off" (i.e. written English so mangled that we simply can't understand it)
These messages let us know that you need help, but they do not tell us what the problem is. If you continue to send us messages like this in response to our requests for specific information or clear grammar, we will eventually decide that you are unwilling to discuss the issue with us and will stop IMing or emailing you until you provide us with the information we need. So, how can you help us to help you? What kind of messages should you send us instead?
  • Tell us exactly what kind of problem you're looking at. Describe it in simple language. Think about what you're trying to do, and then tell us what isn't happening.
    • Example: "I'm trying to start my game, and the game menu isn't popping up," or "I'm trying to make a move in Pentadee, but the board isn't responding."
  • Tell us what you've already tried.
    • Example: "I've clicked on my table multiple times," or "I tried running my table in another sim, but it's still not working."
  • Tell us about any error messages you've received.
    • Example: "My table is telling me that it's unlicensed."
  • If it's a gameplay issue, tell us any details you can remember about the events that led up to it.
    • Example: "We were playing Ludo with three players. When it came time for the blue player's turn, the game skipped them. Everything was working fine up to that point."
  • If it's a purchase issue, please give us as many details about your purchase as you can and state the specific problem you're having.
    • Example: "I purchased Greedy Greedy from you on Marketplace, and didn't receive it. I read the notecard, and tried redelivery, but that didn't work either."
Please know that we will always have to speak to you about your problems. We will very rarely ask to see your table in SL -- and even if we do need to see it, we will still need to ask you questions. If we can't understand what you need, we will not be able to give it to you. It is as simple as that. If you fail to give us the information we need after numerous good faith efforts, if you send us multiple unintelligible messages, or if you simply refuse to communicate with us at all, we will assume you do not want our help and we will stop responding to your IMs or emails until you change your mind.

A product I bought from you keeps disappearing from my inventory.

If specific items seem to keep disappearing from your inventory, we realize that this is a strange and upsetting situation. However, before you accuse us of hacking into your inventory in order to delete or take your K.R. Engineering items, please ask yourself the following question:  Do you have the ability to hack into anyone’s inventory and manipulate the contents? Chances are very good that you do not. Only Lindens have this ability. Neither Karsten Rutledge nor VelvetPurrsons are Lindens, or have alts that are Lindens. Once you purchase one of our products, you are the sole owner of it. We have no ability to track its location or take it back. It is absolutely impossible for us to do so.  Now, if you feel that specific items keep disappearing from your inventory, I’m afraid we don’t have an explanation for you -- but we can offer some advice. 
  • Read our FAQ entry on "missing items." It has some tips that might help you find or restore the item that you're looking for.
  • If the item that keeps disappearing is one of our old prim tables, consider migrating to our new mesh system in order to get a replacement. If you have a mesh table, you can get it redelivered at any time.
  • If the problem continues, talk to the Lindens about it. You can access the SL help desk here.

What is End of Life?

End of Life is an industry standard term used to indicate that specific versions of a product (NOT THE ENTIRE PRODUCT, only really old versions!) have exceeded the time they were expected to remain functional and in use. In practical terms, this means there may be little or no support available for really old versions of a product that have reached the end of their expected life cycles.

What products are affected by your End of Life policy?

See the table below for a list of products and services that are affected by our End of Life policy. The version adjacent to the product below indicates the minimum supported version of that product. If your version is equal to or newer than the minimum supported version, then this End of Life policy does not apply to you. Any product older than the listed version is considered to have exceeded its lifespan. If your product is not listed, then all versions of that product are supported. The table below only lists products which have one or more unsupported versions.
Game Minimum Supported Version Release Date
Greedy Greedy v2.0 Feb 2011
Canoga v1.1 Jun 2012
Pentadee v1.1 Apr 2011
White Horse v1.1 Aug 2014
On-A-Roll v1.8 Sep 2011
Simopolis v1.3 Sep 2011
Snakes and Ladders v1.2 Sep 2011
Shalosh v1.1 Nov 2013
Hearts v1.1 Nov 2013
Spades v1.1 Jan 2012
Triad v1.1 Aug 2014
Khet v2.1 Jul 2014

I have a product that may be affected by the End of Life policy, but the notecard says I should receive lifetime support and updates.

Yes, you are correct -- we offer free lifetime support and updates for all products that have been purchased directly from us. If you have a legitimately purchased product, this policy still applies to you. Please note that you do not need to be the original purchaser of the product, as long as we can trace its heritage back to us. If we can trace your table back to a friend who gifted it to you, for instance, or to a customer who legitimately sold her non-pirated table at a yard sale, we will continue to support the table. If we have no proof that your table was legitimately purchased, then we cannot offer support or updates. Unfortunately, we cannot take responsibility for the actions of those who conduct unethical business practices in Second Life by pirating our games. We apologize for the inconvenience.

If you didn’t want your old tables to be resold, why didn’t you make them no-transfer?

This is a question I (Karsten Rutledge) get often, and unfortunately there is no simple, pat answer I can offer. There are two possible permissions I could sell game tables under, copyable OR transferable. Transferable was the situation until 2018. At the time that I originally made many of my games, making them copyable meant that one person could buy a game table, and rez copies of it on 2, 10, 20, 100, or more sims for their friends, however many they wanted, there was no limit. Second Life has advanced considerably since then, and I have migrated my games to a copy/no-trans system, but there are still many older games floating about the virtual world. Pirates can still duplicate and sell transferable copies of old games, and I do not have the ability to eliminate all transferable versions of my games from Second Life. Given the limitations of the Second Life platform, there just isn't a good solution for preventing the resale of bad or old products. Creators have been begging Linden Lab for a separate "Sale" permission from the "Transfer" permission for the last decade, to control whether an item can be given away or sold away separately, but they're obviously not inclined to make this change. More discrete permissions would give us more control over exactly how we want our products distributed, but this is a shortfall that Second Life will probably have for its entire existence.

If the scammers identified on your website are such bad people, why are all their reviews positive?

Because they delete all the bad ones. A lot of their reviews are from people who don't know they got scammed yet because they've never tried to update their tables, or from people who bought a table and updated it before our policy changed at the beginning of 2015 to drop support for pirated tables. The countless bad reviews that have been left on their product listings since then simply get deleted by them. Stupid, right? The review system on the Marketplace is nearly useless because of this. If you're wondering how they manage to delete the reviews, it's very simple. To delete a review, a seller can simply "flag" the review (there's a link on every review) and mark it as being inappropriate, spam or off-topic. Shortly after, Linden Lab removes it. Sometimes this is a few hours later, sometimes it's a few days later, but they will remove it. In theory, Linden Lab should be verifying the validity of flagged reviews and removing or not removing them as they see fit. This does not appear to actually be happening. Most likely, the staff behind the Marketplace are overworked and don't have time to check whether flagged reviews deserved to be flagged, or contained legitimate complaints. As a result, all flagged reviews simply get deleted without question.

Why don’t you just file a DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) takedown against the scammers who pirate your products?

There's a lot of misunderstanding about what a DMCA takedown request is and what it can do. Companies that host content, such as Linden Lab, are legally required to receive and act upon DMCA takedown notices, but that is all. They don't get to judge the validity of a takedown request, because they're not a court of law. As long as the DMCA takedown notice is properly filed and contains the necessary information, Linden Lab is required to simply obey it and remove the offending content. That all sounds well and good, but here's the problem. Once the offending content has been removed, their obligation ends. The person who had their content removed can simply turn around and file a Counter DMCA. In the Counter DMCA, all they have to do is say, "Nope, the original DMCA was wrong," and Linden Lab will put their content back up. The end. Neither party is required to prove their assertions. Even if they submit "proof," it doesn't matter, because Linden Lab is not a court and cannot pass legal judgement on who is right. In the end, it's a big game of "he said, she said." From Linden Lab's perspective, it goes something like this:
  • Me: That's mine! <take content down>
  • Thief: Nuh uh! <put content back up>
  • Me: Uh huh! <take content down>
  • Thief: Nuh uh! <put content back up>
  • Me: Uh huh! <take content down>
  • Thief: Nuh uh! <put content back up>
  • Me: Uh huh! <take content down>
  • ...repeat forever.
One person is obviously wrong, whether they're lying or merely misinformed. But because Linden Lab does not have the authority to judge which one is right, they can't "punish" anybody or take any more definitive action. Sometimes this whole process can be completed in less than 5 minutes. Listing goes down, 2 minutes later, listing comes back up. It's an enormous waste of time and resources and accomplishes nothing. Why is it like this? Well, a DMCA takedown is supposed to be an immediate response mechanism to intellectual property infringement. A thief who refuses to heed a DMCA takedown should rightfully expect to be sued the next time they put the stolen content back up. A DMCA is a warning shot across the bow, nothing more. The problem is that it is outrageously expensive to pursue such a lawsuit in an actual court of law, and can often take years to see through. It also requires getting Linden Lab themselves involved in the lawsuit, because the first action of any such lawsuit would be to force Linden Lab to turn over any and all information they have on the actual person behind the avatar that you want to sue, as well as any documentation Linden Lab has on the methods of illegal object duplication in use, how long they've known about it, whether and when they've been fixed, whether they can verify or not that a particular account is using any of these exploits, etc. In addition to all of this, Second Life is an international platform. The person behind a given avatar might be in Brazil, while we're in the USA. At that point, the most that you could hope to get is to force Linden Lab to lock that person's account. And then they just make a new account. In the end, it's simply not worth it. Even assuming we won, it doesn't mean we would get anything out of it -- unless for some reason a petty internet thief happens to have a lot of assets, and they're in a country that will work with ours on enforcing copyright law. We might be out years of effort and expense, and get nothing except a potentially worthless injunction out of it.

My supposedly “pirated” product has your name listed as the creator — surely that means it is legitimate?

Unfortunately, no it does not. There are two basic methods for pirating things in Second Life. The first is known as "copybotting." Copybotting is a generic term for duplicating the precise appearance of an object without making a real copy. It's called copybotting because it is often done with "bots", or software that is running an avatar in an automated fashion rather than being controlled by a person. Copybotting works because in order for you to see anything on your screen, it has to be downloaded to your computer. All of the shapes, textures, sounds, animations, etc that you see are all stored on your computer once you've seen them. Copybots abuse this fact to recreate whatever you've seen because it already knows the precise shape, size, textures, etc of the object. There will likely never be a way to prevent this sort of theft. When an object is copybotted, it USUALLY changes "Creator" to whoever did the copying, but it doesn't HAVE to. However, copybotting cannot copy scripts. If someone were to copybot my tables, they would end up with something that looked exactly like my games, but didn't work at all because there are no scripts in it. The second type of piracy comes from permission exploits. My older games are all transfer/no-copy, but there are bugs in Second Life that let people copy them anyway, as if they were really transfer/copy. When copied in this fashion, the copies retain the original creator (me) as well as all of the scripts that they contain. They are indistinguishable from a "legitimate" game because they tricked Second Life into making a copy of it, instead of recreating it themselves. This is what is happening to my games. I personally know of two "bugs" that can make this happen, both of them can done by accident as well as deliberately. There may also be other methods that I'm not aware of as well. For a more in-depth explanation of how piracy works in Second Life, please see our Piracy in Second Life article.

I saw a vehicle called the Neuspa 4×4 ATV, where can I purchase this?

This product was discontinued in 2014 and is no longer available. It is unlikely to return to our store.

Why was it discontinued?

The Neuspa was originally created in 2006. Second Life was a very different world in 2006. There was no mesh, there were no sculpted prims, and the scripting language was substantially more primitive than it is now. What this means is that old objects don't look as good as newer creations, and their scripts use far more resources than modern scripts do. The only way to fix this is to regularly rewrite the scripts to keep them updated, and regularly rebuild the vehicle to match modern standards. This just isn't something that we have the time do currently, as our primary focus is on games. As the Neuspa is not up to the standards of something we feel comfortable selling in our store, it was removed.

Why don't you update it, then?

As we mentioned before, we simply do not have the time. Our primary focus has always been on creating games, not vehicles. Back when the Neuspa was created, we had around 3 games and the Neuspa was created as a side hobby project. Today we have over 25 games. As a result of the popularity of our game systems, we had to discontinue non-gaming products from our store to focus on our core mission.

Can I buy a Neuspa from you anyway?

No. We do not sell the Neuspa in the store or "under the table." To do so would be a irresponsible at this stage. The Neuspa has 73 scripts in it, which is a huge amount of lag to put on any sim for a single vehicle. For comparison, that's the equivalent of having 6 of our games going at the same time. The Neuspa is very old, very ugly, and it's a massive resource hog. Nobody should be using this vehicle anymore. I'm sure there must be many fun, modern vehicles in Second Life to enjoy from talented creators, and you should buy something from them instead.

I just purchased a game license for the first time. Where can I find my game?

If you just purchased or otherwise received a game license, you may be wondering where the actual game is. Our new mesh tables and themes function as rezzers, and can rez any of your game licenses. Therefore, you're not looking for an item that contains the name of the game you purchased (for instance, if you just purchased a copy of Greedy Greedy, you aren't looking for an object called "Greedy Greedy"). Instead, you're looking for the table or theme you want to use to play Greedy Greedy. Look for the folder you received after opening your table or theme delivery box. You should find an item in your inventory that is called "K.R. Engineering Game System" and rez that into the world. Once you've got that, simply click and hold your mouse button on it for a few seconds, and a menu should appear. Choose "Games," and then select the game you want to play. For more information, see the Game Rezzer System section.

I just migrated my games or purchased a brand new mesh game. How do I change the theme?

Under the old prim table system, themes were changed by accessing a menu through the table. Under the new mesh system, each table/theme is its own individual object, and must be rezzed out separately. This is due to one of the major limitations of mesh -- unlike standard or sculpted prims, mesh cannot be programmed to change shape. When you migrate your previous purchases to the new mesh system, you should receive packages containing updated mesh copies of any sculpty themes that you owned, if mesh versions are available. If you don't receive these, you can use the redelivery terminal to request they be sent again. If you owned any sculpty add-on themes prior to migration, you will also receive a Legacy rezzer that will allow you to use those with your new licenses. The Legacy table works just like the old tables did, with the themes accessible through the tabletop menu. If you are a new customer, and you would like to own additional themes, you can simply purchase any of the themes available at our store. K.R. Engineering tables and themes can play any game for which you currently have a license, so if you already own games, you're ready to play.

What is Remote Random, and how do I enable it or turn it off?

As part of integration with Gaming.SL, some games are capable of using random numbers generated from the Gaming.SL server rather than Second Life. As many people are aware, most computers are not capable of producing truly random numbers. Any time a computer gives you a "random" result for anything, be it shuffling cards, rolling dice, etc. it is not actually doing it randomly. It is giving you a number that appears to be random, but is in fact determined by a complex mathematical formula. There are different algorithms for doing this, and some are better than others. Second Life generates random numbers through an LSL function called llFrand(). This function is often criticized for producing poorly generated random numbers. A common complaint with things like dice rolling in Second Life is that you may roll 5, 3, 2 by calling the random number function 3 times in a row, then immediately after, you roll again, and get 5, 3, 2 for a second time. Realistically speaking, this is POSSIBLE when you are rolling real dice as well, but it's not very LIKELY. However, it happens frequently in Second Life, often many times during the same game, and for this reason people often feel like the numbers they're getting are a mistake or a problem with the game, when in fact it's just the numbers that the random number generator gave us to work with. Any attempt to mitigate these kind of results from the random number generator would rightly be viewed as tampering, and would not actually improve the random number generation at all anyway. Games that are equipped with Remote Random features will instead be pulling random numbers into Second Life from an outside source, namely the Gaming.SL server. This lets us control the algorithm that is used to generate the random numbers and with some luck, find one that is better than the one built in to Second Life. In any situation where the game is not able to communicate with the Gaming.SL server for any reason, it will automatically default back to using the llFrand() function so the game can continue unhindered. This feature is considered EXPERIMENTAL. If you do not wish to use it, you may turn it off from the Administration menu of your game by choosing the "Local Random" button. Upon doing so, the game will begin strictly using llFrand() again and not pull any numbers from the server. You can re-enable it at any time by choosing the "Remote Random" button.

How do I update my game?

If your table is running on our new mesh system, you do not need to update the game. Instead, you should update any themes that you own. Updated themes include the latest version of all games supported by that theme. To update your themes:
  • Click and hold your mouse button on part of the theme for three seconds until a menu appears. Then click the button that says "Update."
  • If you don't see the "Update" button, try pressing the <<< or >>> buttons until you see it. The admin menu has multiple pages.
  • If you cannot find an "Update" button, you may have opened the GAME'S admin menu instead of the THEME'S admin menu. You can switch between these with the "Game ↗" and "↙ Rezzer" buttons.
  • After you click the "Update" button, a new theme should be sent to you from our update servers within a few minutes. If you do not receive it, please try again. If you are unable to get an update, please contact us for assistance.
If your table is one of our older prim models, and it has a Gaming.SL logo on the game surface, then your next step is to migrate to the new mesh system. Please see our Migration article for details and instructions. If your table is a very old prim model (such as v1.9x, v1.8x, v1.7x, v1.6x, v1.5x, etc...) then you may run into trouble updating. Please read our End of Life article to see if you qualify for an update. You can also contact us if you have additional questions or concerns.

I want the oval Pocket theme, not the octagon Pocket theme. Where do I find that?

You don't. Very old versions of Pocket Greedy (before v2.0) were slightly smaller and oval in shape, instead of the octagon they are now. This is no longer the case, and we have no plans to change them back. The shape was changed because I (Karsten Rutledge) decided to expand the offering of Pocket games beyond Greedy, to include other games in Pocket format (such as Canoga and Pentadee). The problem with this is that I wanted all of my Pocket games to have a similar style, the same way all my table games have a similar style. Giving them all common infrastructure elements (such as shape, border, etc) is what makes add-on themes possible. If each pocket game were a different shape, then add-on themes would be difficult or impossible to make fit each unique game. Unfortunately, the oval shape was impossible to fit most of my games onto. Pentadee, for example, has a very tall score card, and would not have fit. I decided upon the octagon shape because the full size table games are already designed with an octagon shaped playing area in mind, due to the fact they're all designed to accommodate 8 players. This makes it very easy to adapt future games to Pocket format, because I can simply shrink down the original components. It also means that whatever game I choose to make into a Pocket format will be guaranteed to fit into the space.

Will you bring your games over to other OpenSim-based grids?

Short answer: Not for the foreseeable future, no.Longer multi-part answer (written by Karsten Rutledge):
  • Most money made in Second Life comes from volume sales. It's the reason you can buy a shirt for L$200, which is the equivalent of $0.80 USD. They're called micro-transactions because despite the big numbers we throw around in Second Life (ooh, "thousands"), they're really, really tiny amounts. Our games range between L$295 and L$1995, which translates to about $1.18 to $8.00 USD, or what you'd expect to pay for a good phone/tablet app on iPhone or Android these days. This works because like Android/iPhone app developers, Second Life developers hope to sell not merely hundreds, but thousands of copies of whatever they make. This means that to make developing content worthwhile, you need to have a large market to sell to, because if you're lucky, 1 in 100 people will buy your product. If there's 1000 people, you might sell 10. If there's 10,000 people, you might sell 100, if there's 100,000 people, maybe you'll break the 1000 barrier. It's simple economics. Not everyone is interested in everything, so not everyone is going to buy your product. The biggest problem with OpenSim grids is that they are VERY, VERY SMALL. As of this writing, there are 2000x fewer people connected to InWorldz than Second Life. That means you can roughly expect to sell 2000x fewer of your product on InWorldz than Second Life. In order for that to be worthwhile, you'd have to sell it for 2000x the cost, but nobody would buy it for 2000x the cost. That would make Greedy Greedy $16,000 USD on InWorldz, or any other OpenSim grid. If it were as simple as picking up my games, walking over to an OpenSim grid and rezzing them, I might consider it, but there is a considerable time and resource investment into bringing a product like my games over to another grid, and all indications say "You will never make that money back." It's simply more worthwhile for me to develop new products for Second Life than to port old ones to a nearly empty grid.
  • Some people might argue that this is a chicken and egg problem, or more succinctly, "if you build it, they will come." OpenSim grids are small because of lack of content, but it has a lack of content because it is small, it's a vicious cycle! That may be true, but unfortunately doesn't change economics. I've logged into InWorldz periodically over the last few years (my name is Karsten Rutledge there also) and what I see is not a world suffering from lack of content, it's a world suffering from a poor business plan. InWorldz looks like Second Life from 4 years ago, and performs even worse. The ONLY reason anybody at all is on InWorldz is because they offered super cheap regions compared to Second Life, and then on top of that, offered 45,000 prims per region instead of 15,000. Sounds too good to be true! That's because it is.
    • Second Life regions aren't limited to 15,000 prims out of spite, they're limited that way in an effort to offer both resources and performance at a balance. This doesn't always work because people who use the regions don't understand region performance is a finite resource, but you know what works even less? Tripling the load on the regions. This doesn't just triple the load on the regions, it also triples the load on all of the viewers trying to look at that region. Instead of having to download 15,000 prims from the internet, your computer now has to download 45,000 prims from the internet, and your computer has to render those 45,000 prims on your screen. Sounds good on paper, in practice, people who run Second Life slowly run OpenSim grids EVEN SLOWER, if they can run it at all.
    • This 'super cheap gimmicky regions' philosophy has led to one readily foreseeable and obvious result: It's a wasteland. While I'm writing this, there are enough people connected to have 1 person for every 6 sims. Vast expanses of land with nobody in them.
    • OpenSim is a remarkable effort, but it never was up to the performance of Second Life and probably never will be. I've been standing in a nearly empty InWorldz sim just waiting for a single airplane to fully rez, and half an hour later, it still hasn't, it's just a distorted cluster of half-rezzed sculpts. This happens in every region I go to. OpenSim grids simply can't deliver what they promise.
  • (Update) I'm told InWorldz has Mesh now, at least in beta. Which just further illustrates that InWorldz is just treading water to keep up with Second Life, it's not offering anything new or innovative. Second Life has had mesh for years, and InWorldz is just now getting around to catching up.
  • Scripting support lags behind. For something like skins, this hardly matters, but if Second Life adds a new LSL function and an OpenSim grid doesn't, your scripted content probably doesn't work on that OpenSim grid anymore.
  • If you think 'copybotting' is a problem in Second Life, wait until you see OpenSims. The "open" being the key part. Once you upload your content to an OpenSim grid, it's now "in the wild" so to speak. The one last bastion of security in Second Life is that scripts are still not accessible to copybots. If you're a skin designer, your skin is no more at risk on an OpenSim than it is in Second Life, to see a skin or other texture your computer has to download it (although new server-side avatar baking is making this much harder, thankfully, something else I believe OpenSims don't do, meaning your skins are now less safe in OpenSim than Second Life), so you are essentially passing out copies to anyone who even sees an avatar wearing your skin, much less buying it. You only see the EFFECTS of scripts though, not the scripts themselves. Therefore porting scripted content to an OpenSim grid carries a huge additional risk, because now you are making your scripts available to a much wider group of people, namely whoever has administrative access to that OpenSim grid.
  • All in all, I believe competition for Second Life is healthy and good, but OpenSim grids aren't competition. They're poorly made ripoffs trying to lure people in with cheap gimmicks, and that's probably all they will ever be. If one of them manages to achieve any significant market size or, shockingly, innovates on Virtual Worlds somehow, I'll probably be keenly interested. In fact, I am now offering my products on the Sinespace platform.

My name isn’t showing up on scorekeepers or gamekeepers, or on the Gaming.SL website.

This is because you (or someone you know, if you're reading this article for them!) specifically requested not to appear on scoreboards. You did this by touching the Gaming.SL logo on a game table and selecting the "Opt Out" button. You can fix this by touching the Gaming.SL logo on a game table, and pressing the "Opt Out" button a second time. On newer game tables, this button is marked as "Opt Out|In" and spawns a warning dialog box asking ARE YOU SURE you want to do this. On older tables, it will simply tell you in local chat what it is you have done after you click on it. You can check out our article on Gaming.SL Live to learn more about the features of G.SL. NOTE: Opting out also prevents you from earning achievements and participating in grid-wide jackpots.

Why do I only see candles on my game table?

On very, very old versions of our game tables you could touch the base of the table (the flat round part at the bottom) to "hide" the game and display some lovely decorative candles, instead. You probably touched it by accident. Just touch it again to bring the game back. Or better yet, update your game, because your table was around to witness newbies being sacrificed to the volcano in Mahulu.

Some of the buttons on my game don’t work when I press them.

The most common cause for this is an invisible object covering the buttons. Many objects could stand between you and the table without your realizing it, such as invisible HUDs, certain shields, and alphas from nearby objects -- most often plant foliage. To check if this is the case for you, open the View menu on your viewer and turn on the "Highlight Transparent" feature. Alternatively, you can press Ctrl+Alt+T on your keyboard. This will cause any invisible objects to appear red and foggy. Make sure there are no red prims covering the table that you are accidentally clicking on, or invisible HUDs obstructing your cursor. Use the View menu or press Ctrl+Alt+T again to turn off the highlighting. If no invisible objects seem to be covering the buttons, please consult this FAQ entry.

My game doesn’t work at all. NONE of the buttons work. What do I do?

First, you should verify that no invisible items are covering the buttons, as discussed in this FAQ. Next, you should verify that you are not in a no-scripts zone. If you're not in a no-scripts zone, then right-click on your game and choose the "Open" option. If there is nothing in the contents, then you may have removed all the scripts from your game or table somehow. There is no way to fix this, and the game will have to be replaced. If it's a newer mesh model, you can use our Redelivery terminal to get a replacement. If it's an older prim G.SL model, you can Migrate in order to receive an updated replacement. If it's a very old prim model, please see our End of Life article to see if you qualify for a replacement. If there are scripts inside the game when you open it, the problem may be that the scripts got deactivated, possibly by the estate tools. The game will have to be replaced if this is the case. Follow the instructions above to get an updated, fresh replacement, and see if the problem persists. If it does, please contact us.

My game paid the winner twice (or more times), and I lost money. What do I do?

As of September 1st, 2014, gambling on K.R. Engineering tables is against the Second Life Terms of Service. If your table receives payment in order to facilitate gambling, you should update your table to a compliant version immediately. Please see our Skill Gaming article for more details. More than likely, a double payout means you have more than one Prize Server rezzed in the same region (sim). One server works for every game in the same sim, unless you tell the prize server to only listen to a single table. See the Prize Server article for more information.

My game is running very slowly, what is wrong with it?

The speed of objects in Second Life is affected by the speed of the simulator they are rezzed in. If the simulator is running very slowly, which happens when it is overloaded, then everything in the sim will also run slowly. Void/Homestead/Openspace sims are always going to be much slower than full simulators even if they are relatively empty. In short, the problem is not with the game -- the problem is with everything rezzed around the game.

My game has texture fighting problems on the tabletop, is this something that can be fixed?

Unfortunately, no. If you are seeing texture fighting (usually the black backboard and the wooden game table surface are most commonly noticeable), then you are probably at a really high altitude, such as greater than 1000 meters up. This happens because of rounding errors in the math (such as 1.06 getting rounded to 1.0, which indicates a loss of precision) that the Second Life viewer uses when calculating where to display each part of the game. The math gets less and less accurate the higher up you go. When SL first started, we were limited to building up to 768m high for that reason. Linden Lab raised the cap to 4096m, but the problem is still there. For some things, it doesn't matter -- nobody cares if their couch cushions aren't quite where they should be. But in the case of our games, the black backboard and the wooden table surface are both parallel and fairly close together, so the rounding error shows up on it in a big way. At that altitude, Second Life thinks that prims that were separated by a small amount are no longer separated at all, and draws them in the exact same position even though they are not. The only solution is to use the table at a lower altitude, generally less than 1000 meters, although your mileage may vary depending on your graphics settings. You can see this for yourself if you move the table down to lower altitudes. At ground level you will see the table most correctly, but the flickering will stop well before then. The only way I could "fix" this issue is by separating all the game elements much farther away from the table surface, but this would cause the game to look strange at normal altitudes instead of looking strange at high altitudes, a trade-off that's not really practical or desirable.

Whenever I brand my table, some or all of the dice disappear. What am I doing wrong?

This happens whenever you use a texture that has an alpha layer (transparency) on the backboard. The dice are partially transparent, so you end up with the well-known issue of "texture fighting" on your board, where the viewer isn't sure whether to display the dice on top or the backboard on top. Even if your texture does not have any visible areas that are transparent, it can still have an alpha layer. If you are the original creator of the texture, try uploading it again without an alpha layer. The easiest way to do this is to save it as a .jpg (Jpeg) or a .bmp (Bitmap) file before upload. .png (Portable Network Graphics) will also work, as long as you know how to save it specifically as a 24-bit .png file (minus the 8-bit alpha layer that a 32-bit .png file has).

Since I upgraded my table, I can’t choose specific seats to sit at anymore.

You still can, actually. Newer tables have a new theme system that allows them to have cushions on the seats, but the cushions are not part of the seats. So if you try to sit on the cushions, it is no different than trying to sit on the table itself. In these cases, Second Life will simply seat you at the next available seat in order. To choose a specific seat, try right-clicking on the chair back instead of the chair seat and choosing "Play." Some themes may drastically alter the shape of the chairs, but you can always still choose a specific seat by right-clicking the correct prim.

Will you create a custom game for me or my business?

At this time, we do not offer custom games or game tables. We simply do not have the time. Most of our game tables have the ability to change their centerboard texture if you wish to brand them for your establishment, or replace them with a picture. Additionally, our new mesh gaming system allows you to choose from many different themes and tables when it comes to decorating your space. We do not offer custom themes, but we will gladly take suggestions for future themes you would like to see made available.

Can I buy a copyable or modifiable version of one of your games?

Our new mesh tables and themes have copy/no-trans permissions. If you have one of our older no-copy tables, you can Migrate to the new mesh system for free. You can learn more about the differences between our prim and mesh tables by visiting our Migration article. You may also want to check out our Game Licenses article, as while the tables and themes are copyable under the new system, the games themselves are not. Anything that we currently offer with no-copy permissions (such as our game licenses) or no-mod permissions (such as our tables and themes) should be considered sold as-is. We will not alter the permissions on any of our items. This also falls under our custom game policy. Why won't we sell mod versions of our products? The reason is simple. Any game that is modifiable opens it up to potential abuse by the owner of the table, including manipulating the outcome of the game by inserting extra scripts into the game contents. This is bad both for our business and for anyone who owns one or more of our games. If even the possibility of a game table being rigged exists, then it damages the credibility of every one of our games in Second Life. If a dispute arises, we can say, "No, the game tables can not be rigged by unscrupulous hosts," because it is true. We need that deniability, and so does every honest game host on the grid. It is important that people trust the outcome of a game to be fair and based only on legitimate game actions. Additionally, offering mod items opens us up to the possibility of piracy. We already deal with enough stolen tables as it is -- we don't need more floating around!

Can I gamble on your games?

No, you cannot. Gambling is currently a violation of the Second Life Terms of Service. Please see the Skill Gaming article for more information. If you have an older game, it may have the option to gamble on it, but you absolutely should not do so. In fact, you should update your table immediately, as you can get in trouble for having a game with payout options, even if you don't use them.

My game got deeded to a group, and now I can’t do anything with it. What do I do?

Presumably, since the table got deeded to the group that means you are either a group officer or a group owner. As such, you can simply set the table for sale for 0L and buy it back from the group. To do this:
    1. Right-click on the table and choose 'Edit...'
    2. If you have not used the building interface before, you may need to click the 'More' button to expand the window.
    3. Go to the 'General' tab on the left of the window and check "For Sale."
    4. Be sure to set the price next to this to 0.
    5. Below the For Sale box it should say 'Original', 'Copy' and 'Contents', make sure that Original is the button that is marked.
    6. Now right-click on the table again and choose 'Buy.' The table will still remain rezzed, but you should now be the owner again.
Our mesh tables and themes cannot be deeded to a group, as they are copy/no-trans. If you have an older table that is deeded to a group, you will have to buy it back using the technique detailed above before you can migrate it. If you use the Migrate function prior to getting your game back from the group, your game will not migrate.

I picked up my game, and when I tried to rez it out again I got a message telling me “do not rez games directly from your inventory.”

If you try to pick up a game table or theme while a game is actively running on it, you risk disconnecting the actual game from the table or theme. This is because our new mesh tables work as rezzers, and rez the game elements on top. You will receive the following message if you then try to rez out the game and not the table or theme it was sitting on. "DO NOT REZ GAMES DIRECTLY FROM YOUR INVENTORY! Games must ONLY be rezzed using the Games menu on a Game System or they will not work correctly!" In this case, you can go ahead and delete the game portion you have rezzed and any copies in your inventory. Rez out a fresh copy of your table or theme, and use that to start your game again. You can get more details by visiting this FAQ entry.

I purchased a game, and I didn’t receive my license.

You will not receive a physical copy of your game license. Your license is just data in our server that tells us that you own a particular game. When you purchase a new game from us, you should see a pop-up menu that tells you that the game is now available to access on any of your mesh tables or themes.  You will need a mesh table in order to play one of our games. You can purchase a premium table or theme in our store, or pick up a free mesh table to get started. There are signs in every corner of our store advising you to select a table or theme first, as well as reminder placards displayed beside every game. If you already have a mesh table rezzed out, and don't see your new license listed among your games, you may have to refresh the list. You can do this by clicking and holding on your table, selecting "Games," and selecting "Refresh."

I need my license key — where do I find that?

Your license key is different from the UUID key that Second Life generates for your mesh table. This key changes each time an object is rezzed out. To get your permanent license key, just follow these simple instructions:
  1. Start the game you need the key for on your table.
  2. Click the G.SL logo.
  3. Click the button that says "G.SL Info."
  4. Copy the key.

My leaderboards/scoreboards aren’t updating after I finish a game. How can I fix that?

By default, the scoreboards included with your game update every 12 hours. You can make them update in real time by following the instructions below.
  1. Click and hold on your table, and start the game you want to update in real time.
  2. Click and hold on the game to bring up the game-specific menu. (On some tables, you may get the rezzer menu instead depending on where you click. If you do, you will see a button that says "Game ->." Click this to go to the game-specific menu.) Then click the button that says ">>>" to go to the second page of the menu.
  3. Click the button that says "ExtAPI On."
  4. Turn to your scoreboards. For each board you want to update in real time, click on the board. Then click the button that says, "ExtAPI On."
You must enable ExtAPI for each game you want to update in real time. You must also enable ExtAPI on each separate scoreboard you wish to update in real time.

How do I opt out of Gaming.SL Live? How can I opt out of data collection?

This is very simple to do. Just click the Gaming.SL logo on any Gaming.SL enabled game in Second Life, and click the button that says "Opt Out." You can also use the Opt Out kiosk in our store, which is located on the wall by the front door. Should you change your mind, simply repeat this process to opt back in to Gaming.SL.

What does this opt me out of?

  • You will disappear off of the website. You will not show up for achievements, leaderboards, jackpots, player profiles, or any other features of the website.
  • You will no longer appear on in-world Scorekeepers or Gamekeepers or any other objects in Second Life that access data from Gaming.SL.
  • Gaming.SL will no longer record information that pertains only to your account, such as achievements. As such, you will no longer gain achievements and will no longer see them announced for you in-world.

What does this NOT opt me out of?

  • In order to record that you have opted out of Gaming.SL features, the database must maintain a record of your account that is flagged as having opted out, so we know to ignore it in the future. This record contains no private information, only freely available information to everyone in Second Life. It will, however, not be visible on the website anymore.
  • If you win a game, the game must still upload the results of the game to the Gaming.SL website, which includes the UUID of the person who won it and the UUIDs of the other participating players. However, information pertaining to you will not show up on the website, such as on leaderboards and jackpots. If you win a game, it will be recorded, but it won’t be visible anywhere.
  • Any existing information in the database at the time of opt-out will continue to exist, but will simply become unavailable on the website. This means any achievements or similar that you have incurred while playing will still be recorded in the database, but will not be accessible on the website. Also, no NEW information will be added to the database after opting out. If you wish to have all old information removed from the database, please contact us. We do not remove achievements and other old data immediately upon opting out because customers often opt-out by accident, and we do not want to destroy their Gaming.SL experience because they accidentally pressed the wrong button.
  • Owning and playing games will still work normally.
  • This does not disconnect your game table from the website, only you personally. Other people can continue to gain achievements and high scores on your game table.
  • If you have purchased add-ons for your games, they will continue to work normally. It also does not prevent you from buying more add-ons, themes, or games in the future.

My Greedy Greedy table requires players to reach 1000 points before they can join the game. How do I change the settings so that players can start with any number of points?

This option is called the "Initial Barrier." When it is turned on, players must reach 1000 points before they can join the game. When it is turned off, players may join the game with any number of points. You can manage this option from the Administration menu of your game. To do so:
  1. Make sure your Greedy Greedy game is running on your table or theme.
  2. Click and hold on the game to bring up the game's administrative menu. (On certain rezzer versions, depending on where you click, you may open the REZZER'S administrative menu instead of the GAME'S administrative menu. This is okay! If you are in the rezzer admin menu, you can switch directly over to the game admin menu by pressing the “Game ↗” button. Likewise if you open the game menu by mistake, and wish to switch over to the rezzer menu, you can simply press the “↙ Rezzer” button.)
  3. Use the <<< and >>> buttons at the bottom of the admin menu to flick through the menu pages until you see a button that says "Initial On" or "Initial Off."
  4. If the button says "Initial On," and you want to turn the option on, click it. Contrariwise, if the button says "Initial Off," and you want to turn the option off, click it.
For more information about Greedy Greedy's administrative options, please see our article about Greedy Greedy.

I would like to purchase an additional license for my game — how can I do that?

Under our new mesh system, there is no such thing as a "secondary instance license." All of our licenses are the same, and each license entitles you to run one copy of a game at a particular time. In order to buy an additional license, you simply need to purchase another copy of the game. We do not offer a discount for buying multiple game licenses, aside from our Reward Points program. When we sold no-copy/trans prim game tables, each game purchase entitled our customers to one no-copy table. It is the same with our game licenses. Each purchase entitles our customers to one no-copy game license. At K.R. Engineering, our policy has always been, "one purchase equals one game."

My leaderboards/scoreboards aren’t working at all. How can I fix this?

First, check to make sure that they are set to the right game! This is our most common issue when it comes to misbehaving scoreboards. Look at the top corners of your scoreboard, where you will see a logo telling you which game the scoreboard is currently tracking. If it is not the game that you want to track (for instance, if you're playing Greedy Greedy and your scoreboard is trying to show scores for On-a-Roll), then the following steps should correct it.
  1. Click on your scoreboard.
  2. Click the "Change" button.
  3. Click the name of the game you want to follow.
If  your scoreboard is set to track the right game, and scores still aren't showing up, please see our FAQ about real-time updates. If you or a particular person in your group isn't showing up on the board at all, please see our FAQ about opting out of G.SL data collection.

What is the history behind the real life version of On-A-Roll? Why can’t I buy a RL On-A-Roll board?

On-A-Roll was devised by two men in 1993. World Research Company of Tyler, Texas was approached about manufacturing the game as they had all of the necessary equipment already. World Research specializes in Dry Erase products which is why the On-A-Roll game board is a green dry-erase board that has the game printed onto it. When it was launched it was briefly featured in a printed magazine.

Discontinuation

On-A-Roll is no longer manufactured as of March 2009. World Research cites lack of interest in the product as the reason it is no longer manufactured.

Sad Facts

On-A-Roll was discontinued because the company has never had much interest in promoting it. After being featured in the magazine for a few months in 1993, it was dropped and has been completely ignored by them since then for all marketing purposes. The exposure it has gotten in Second Life is probably the most exposure it has ever had. There has never been a website for it, you could never find it in stores, the only way anyone knew that it existed was to call and order it over the phone, and you had to know to specifically ask for it by name because it was not part of the official company catalog. I brought this up with them again as I have done several times before and was met with more disinterest. This great game is just disappearing because the manufacturer lacked interest in it, not because the consumers lack interest in it. This game has been in our family for a decade, and is probably now a collector's item.

World Research Shuts Down

As of April 2014, World Research Company of Tyler, Texas has ceased operations entirely.